About

Anna E Weiser is a Swedish composer / sound choreographer, vocalist, writer, and about to be a trained Somatic Movement Educator. Her artistic focus is spatial sensibility and listening. Listening is central to her practice, she works from a somatic perspective, in a transdisciplinary sounding art context.

She has studied composition and free art at The Gotland School of Music Composition, and holds a Master’s degree in Music – Intermedia – from KMH, The Royal College of Music, in Stockholm, 2010-12, a program in collaboration with the University College of Arts, Craft and Design, and the KTH, Royal Institute of Technology.

Listening with all senses for differences in timbre is for me a way of perceiving the world. I am interested in exploring and communicating the art of listening as a kintestetic potential. I’m also intrigued by how to make sense of sound. For me life is a transdisciplinary art of movement back and worth through membranes. I see myself as a body of organic systems interconnected with the ones surrounding me, and I see my task as a human being to keep on tuning this interconnectedness, keeping the pathways open. Its important for me to stay in relation, be in connection. I work with organic materials - silk, seeds, paper, grass, clay, etc. – and principles of movement patterns, as a basis for musical works, installations, stage productions, or lyrics. Its the deepest questions about interplay, interconnectnedness, about ecosystems, that weave together what I do.

I grew up, and returned in the end of the 90th to the countryside of the Swedish island Gotland in the middle of the Baltic Sea. My decision to study composition and to work as an artist grew out of being a mother wholeheartedly for many years. Children, my own and others, are my best teachers in listening and understanding the necessity for complexity in order to grow simplicity. Growing up and then raising my own children in a small society has strengthened my belief in the importance of artistic presence in rural areas. It questions dominating urban norms in societal development, as well in art. It also questions rural norms when becoming too narrow-minded. 

Together with my husband Wolfgang Weiser, balance artist and teacher of the Alexander Technique, I run Vibrationsverket (Vibration Plant), an educational art centre for sound and balance, currently focusing on developing performances and workshops for children, youth and families.